Your interview comes to an end. Express your interest in the company (if you are keen) and thank the interviewer by name for their time. If you have not already discussed it, ask the interviewer what the next step in the interview process will be and when you will find out about the company's decision. Make a prompt exit, but do not appear to be overly anxious to leave. Be sure to say farewell to the receptionist/secretary also.

After you are out of the building and back at your car (or train, or bus....), take out your notepad and jot down a few notes. Recap the interview, outlining the main points discussed, as well as the following items:

  • What was the interviewer's full name and title?
  • What was the receptionist/secretary's name?
  • Who else from the company did you meet?
  • Exactly what does the job entail?
  • Did they mention salary…...what was said?

Ask yourself the following questions about the interview as a whole. Use your answers to these questions to help you prepare for your next interview.

  • How adequately did I prepare myself for the interview?
  • Was there anything I should have known about the company that I did not?
  • How effective was my role in the interview?
  • Having seen people in the company, how appropriately was I dressed?
  • Which questions did I handle well?
  • Which questions did I handle poorly?
  • How thorough were my answers?
  • How well did I emphasise how my skills will benefit the position?
  • How well did I ask questions?
  • What could I have done differently?

Sending a follow-up letter
Typically, only about 25% of applicants show the courtesy of writing a follow-up letter to thank the interviewer for their time. If they are torn between you and another applicant, your follow-up letter may just tip the scale in your favour. If you know the second interview is to be fairly soon, you may wish to hand-deliver the letter. It is not wise to put the interviewer on the spot by asking to see them again – posting through the door or leaving it with the receptionist will suffice. Don’t be too pushy! You may also wish to write a brief note to the secretary and to any other company employees you met during the interview. (You don't remember their names? Shame on you. You should have jotted them down immediately after the interview!) Thank them for their time and help, and offer to send them any additional information that they may need to help get you this job. It may not help, but it definitely won't hurt.

Second interviews
For some positions, you may go through a series of interviews before being offered a position with the company. When you are called back for a second interview, be especially sure to review your Post-Interview Evaluation. Work on those areas you did not feel comfortable with, and strive to improve your strong points.

After you are out of the building and back at your car (or train, or bus....), take out your notepad and jot down a few notes. Recap the interview, outlining the main points discussed, as well as the following items:

  • What was the interviewer's full name and title?
  • What was the receptionist/secretary's name?
  • Who else from the company did you meet?
  • Exactly what does the job entail?
  • Did they mention salary…...what was said?

Ask yourself the following questions about the interview as a whole. Use your answers to these questions to help you prepare for your next interview.

  • How adequately did I prepare myself for the interview?
  • Was there anything I should have known about the company that I did not?
  • How effective was my role in the interview?
  • Having seen people in the company, how appropriately was I dressed?
  • Which questions did I handle well?
  • Which questions did I handle poorly?
  • How thorough were my answers?
  • How well did I emphasise how my skills will benefit the position?
  • How well did I ask questions?
  • What could I have done differently?

Sending a follow-up letter
Typically, only about 25% of applicants show the courtesy of writing a follow-up letter to thank the interviewer for their time. If they are torn between you and another applicant, your follow-up letter may just tip the scale in your favour. If you know the second interview is to be fairly soon, you may wish to hand-deliver the letter. It is not wise to put the interviewer on the spot by asking to see them again – posting through the door or leaving it with the receptionist will suffice. Don’t be too pushy! You may also wish to write a brief note to the secretary and to any other company employees you met during the interview. (You don't remember their names? Shame on you. You should have jotted them down immediately after the interview!) Thank them for their time and help, and offer to send them any additional information that they may need to help get you this job. It may not help, but it definitely won't hurt.

Second interviews
For some positions, you may go through a series of interviews before being offered a position with the company. When you are called back for a second interview, be especially sure to review your Post-Interview Evaluation. Work on those areas you did not feel comfortable with, and strive to improve your strong points.

Public Transport by Train

Ashchurch Train Station, will need to use a Taxi

Public Transport by Bus

Services from Cheltenham and surrounding areas

Parking

Long-term
Bishops Walk Car Park
Oldbury Rd, Tewkesbury

We are specialists in the following employment sectors in Gloucestershire, Worcestershire and Herefordshire

Areas of expertise

Accountant Accounts/Finance Administration
Buyer/Procurement Officer
Customer Service
Engineering
HR
IT/Technical
Management/Supervisor
Office Junior/Trainee
PA/Secretarial
Project Management
Reception
Sales/Marketing
Technician
Warehouse/Assembly

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© First Choice Recruitment, 62 High Street, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, GL20 5BJ

© First Choice Recruitment, 62 High Street, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, GL20 5BJ

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